Our Health

Our Health

When we think about our health, we really don’t. I am a 53 year female. Although I think about my health, I really don’t. A few months ago, I started having some medical problems. I went to have a physical. My doctor told me I was diabetic.

At first, I was in denial. But that wasn’t the problem. After telling my doctor there was something really wrong with me, she sent me to another doctor who said I was packed and needed a laxative. Knowing that was not the problem, I told him that whatever was wrong with me, it must be in the blood. Because they are doctors, sometimes they don’t listen to you. I was so sick that I literally could not get out of bed most of the time. My feet, knees, elbows, wrists and ankles hurt so bad...

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Keeping Tabs On Your Health In Texas

Keeping Tabs On Your Health In Texas

Your personal health information – do you know who has it or where to find it in Dallas, Houston or in the other Texas cities where you have lived? Do you have it? In most cases, a complete record of all of your personal health information can’t be found at any single location or in any consistent format. Each one of your healthcare providers (family practitioner, allergist, OB-GYN, etc.) compiles a separate medical record on you. And often times, these multiple medical records can lead to an incomplete story about your health.

Keeping your own personal health record (PHR) provides doctors with valuable information that can help improve the quality of care you receive. A PHR can minimize or eliminate duplicate tests...

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Exercise For The Diabetic

Exercise For The Diabetic

Along with medical nutritional therapy and insulin, exercise is the third component to successfully treating diabetes. Exercise, like insulin, lowers blood glucose levels, assists in maintaining normal lipid levels, and increases circulation. For most individuals, consistent and individualized exercise helps reduce the therapeutic dose of insulin.

Diabetics should be forewarned that they should never perform exercise during the time that their insulin level is at its peak. The ideal time for a diabetic to exercise is when their blood glucose level is between 100 to 200 mg/dl or about thirty to sixty minutes after meals. They should also avoid exercising when their blood glucose is above 250 mg/dl and ketones are present in the urine.

There...

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